I've just been described as a Quaker entrepreneur . . .

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I've just been described as a Quaker entrepreneur . . .

I was invited by Friends' House to write a piece about Norwich Mustard. I did not set out to make it a Quaker venture, but with me a Quaker at the helm, I guess it was inevitable that the testimonies (simplicity, peace, equality & truth) would inform my decision making.

Norwich Mustard is starting to come together nicely as a project and we continue to attract attention from the media, from potential collaobrators and from others who simply see potential for others to be inspired by what we're doing.

Here's a link to the article. There's aso a picture of my tractor, which if course is important too

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Power to Change

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Power to Change

I know I’m far from alone in wanting to change the world. Many are dissatisfied with the way things are and want to make things better.

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Challenging perceptions

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Challenging perceptions

I’ve just completed a three day intellectual marathon, attending the Norwich Literary Festival. Belinda and I also attended some of the concerts, in St Andrew’s Hall and the Cathedral, but the literary events, in Chapelfield Gardens and a week earlier, at City Hall, I attended on my own.

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Clockwork Entrepreneur

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Clockwork Entrepreneur

It was sad to hear on this morning that inventor Trevor Baylis has died at the age of 80. I was commissioned to interview him in 2010 and spent a very enjoyable morning talking with him at his home on Eeel Pie Island on the Thames.

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Norwich Mustard

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Norwich Mustard

I've long been a fan of community owned cooperatives. It's a fair, open and enterprising way that people who feel strongly about something can stop sounding off and do something positive. The story of Colman's mustard leaving Norwich is just such an opportunity.

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Can a Council be too enterprising?

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Can a Council be too enterprising?

I have to acknowledge the innovative approach to funding community groups taken by one local Council. They’re launching a lottery and are promising that 50% of the ticket money will be given to good causes. I remember years ago when working on a hospice project looking at the economics of local lotteries. They can be very good ways to grow income.

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