I've made the front cover!

For decades, I've been a member of Mensa and avid reader of the monthly magazine. I've never flaunted my IQ, although it's probably one of the reasons people say I'm unusual. I just see the world differently and tend to challenge everything. 

A while ago I was interviewed by Robin Healey for the November issue. Already it's prompted some interesting emails. When you talk with other Mensa members, it's surprising how much you actually have in common.

View a pdf of the feature story here and if you're not a member, you can find out more about joining here.


In 1903 Bertrand Russell wrote that: 'All progress depends on the unreasonable man.' Yet we have an education system that measures all young people against the same performance criteria. The tension this creates in young minds is illustrated by the growing incidence of self-harm and other manifestations of poor mental health.
 

People hire Robert to solve what academics call ‘wicked problems’. These are often complicated conundrums where conventional solutions won’t work. Whilst the problem might present as something simple, for example a need to grow income, Robert’s solution will often include introducing things that may not yet be understood, yet alone considered.

Working with Robert